How Do Women Feel About Their Bodies?

posted by Paul James - 

“Women’s Health” magazine has just come out with their first-ever global Naked Issue, and not only does it have a naked Sofia Vergara on the cover, but it also shares some insights into how women around the world really feel about their naked bodies.

The mag conducted a survey about women’s complex relationship with their body, and it turns out most women (62%) say they are “accepting or neutral” about their bodies, rather than have a positive (15%) or negative (23%) feeling about them.

When it comes to the body positive movement that seems to be gaining steam across the country, 47% of women say they are thankful all types of bodies are being accepted, while 36% look at it negatively. It seems, 18% say they are annoyed because they believe it’s just "a new way to make women obsess over how their bodies look,” while 14% say it brings added pressure, because when they feel bad about their bodies, they now feel bad about feeling bad. And believe it or not, 4% of women say the body positive movement makes them feel even worse about their bodies.

And when it comes to being naked,  the majority of women would rather wear clothes. In fact, 65% of women say they look better dressed, while 30% say they look good both ways, and only 5% prefer their naked body.

  • ONE MORE THING! Globally, women in Latin America are the most likely to think they are beautiful (84%), followed by Greece (82%), with the United States pretty far down on the list at just (62%). 

Percentage of Women Who Think They Are Beatiful (By Country)

  • Latin America (84%)
  • Greece (82%)
  • Turkey (79%)
  • Brazil (79%)
  • Netherlands (78%)
  • Russia (78%)
  • Germany (75%)
  • South America (72%)
  • Spain (72%)
  • United States (68%)
  • Australia (63%)
  • Sweden (59%)
  • UK (50%)
  • Poland (49%) 

Source: Women’s Health

Paul James

Paul James

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